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1. chinaXiv:202102.00031 [pdf]

Dialectical thinking is linked with smaller bilateral nucleus accumbens and right amygdala: the mediating role of sensitivity to reward

Huixian Li; Xiaomeng Hu
Subjects: Psychology >> Physiological Psychology

Our current work examined the interface of thinking style and mental health at both behavioral and neuropsychological levels which describe a predisposition to psychopathology. Thirty-nine Chinese participants were divided into high and low holistic thinkers based on the triad task scores, completed the Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ), and performed structural and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. We found that high holistic thinkers were much less sensitive to reward than low holistic thinkers. Furthermore, their bilateral nucleus accumbens and right amygdala volumes were smaller than those of low holistic thinkers. Our integrated results showed that the relationship between holistic thinking tendency and the amygdala volume was mediated by the nucleus accumbens and the sensitivity to reward. Finally, resting-state functional connectivity results showed increased FC between left nucleus accumbens and bilateral amygdala in high holistic thinkers. The present synthetical results suggest that dialectical thinking may lead to better mental health outcomes.

submitted time 2021-02-09 Hits305Downloads145 Comment 0

2. chinaXiv:202010.00012 [pdf]

Do Experiences Studying Abroad Promote Dialectical Thinking?

Hu, Xiaomeng; Wang, Yang; Liao, Shanhui; Kaiping Peng
Subjects: Psychology >> Social Psychology

Our current work seeks to provide direct evidence on whether Chinese international students’ experiences studying abroad promote dialectical thinking. We collected behavioral data from 258 Chinese international students studying in multiple regions. We found that when primed with studying abroad (relative to traveling abroad, their hometown culture and a control condition), participants were more likely to show tolerance for contradiction, meaning that they deemed both sides of contradictory scientific statements as convincing and rated them more favorably. Therefore, it is plausible that Chinese international students’ experiences studying abroad promote their dialectical thinking regardless of their host culture. More work is needed to further this line of research by 1) extending these effects with other measures of dialectical thinking, 2) adopting differing paradigms to provide more robust findings, and 3) understanding how experiences studying abroad may promote dialectical thinking.

submitted time 2020-10-19 Hits2941Downloads426 Comment 0

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