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1. chinaXiv:201605.01735 [pdf]

PTEN deficiency reprogrammes human neural stem cells towards a glioblastoma stem cell-like phenotype

Duan, Shunlei; Yuan, Guohong; Ren, Ruotong; Xu, Xiuling; Fu, Lina; Li, Ying; Yang, Jiping; Zhang, Weiqi; Liu, Guang-Hui; Liu, Xiaomeng; Li, Jingyi; Tang, Fuchou; Ren, Ruotong; Bai, Ruijun; Liu, Guang-Hui; Ren, Ruotong; Bai, Ruijun; Qu, Jing; Zhang, Weizhou; Wu, Jun
Subjects: Biology >> Biophysics

PTEN is a tumour suppressor frequently mutated in many types of cancers. Here we show that targeted disruption of PTEN leads to neoplastic transformation of human neural stem cells (NSCs), but not mesenchymal stem cells. PTEN-deficient NSCs display neoplasm-associated metabolic and gene expression profiles and generate intracranial tumours in immunodeficientmice. PTEN is localized to the nucleus in NSCs, binds to the PAX7 promoter through association with cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB)/CREB binding protein (CBP) and inhibits PAX7 transcription. PTEN deficiency leads to the upregulation of PAX7, which in turn promotes oncogenic transformation of NSCs and instates 'aggressiveness' in human glioblastoma stem cells. In a large clinical database, we find increased PAX7 levels in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma. Furthermore, we identify that mitomycin C selectively triggers apoptosis in NSCs with PTEN deficiency. Together, we uncover a potential mechanism of how PTEN safeguards NSCs, and establish a cellular platform to identify factors involved in NSC transformation, potentially permitting personalized treatment of glioblastoma.

submitted time 2016-05-15 Hits2495Downloads908 Comment 0

2. chinaXiv:201605.01375 [pdf]

Characterization of a novel mouse model with genetic deletion of CD177

Xie, Qing; Li, Xiangrui; Xie, Qing; Parlet, Corey; Borcherding, Nicholas; Kolb, Ryan; Li, Wei; Tygrett, Lorraine; Waldschmidt, Thomas; Olivier, Alicia; Zhang, Weizhou; Klesney-Tait, Julia; Keck, Kathy; Chen, Songhai; Liu, Guang-Hui; Liu, Guang-Hui
Subjects: Biology >> Biophysics >> Cell Biology

Neutrophils play an essential role in the innate immune response to infection. Neutrophils migrate from the vasculature into the tissue in response to infection. Recently, a neutrophil cell surface receptor, CD177, was shown to help mediate neutrophil migration across the endothelium through interactions with PECAM1. We examined a publicly available gene array dataset of CD177 expression from human neutrophils following pulmonary endotoxin instillation. Among all 22,214 genes examined, CD177 mRNA was the most upregulated following endotoxin exposure. The high level of CD177 expression is also maintained in airspace neutrophils, suggesting a potential involvement of CD177 in neutrophil infiltration under infectious diseases. To determine the role of CD177 in neutrophils in vivo, we constructed a CD177-genetic knockout mouse model. The mice with homozygous deletion of CD177 have no discernible phenotype and no significant change in immune cells, other than decreased neutrophil counts in peripheral blood. We examined the role of CD177 in neutrophil accumulation using a skin infection model with Staphylococcus aureus. CD177 deletion reduced neutrophil counts in inflammatory skin caused by S. aureus. Mechanistically we found that CD177 deletion in mouse neutrophils has no significant impact in CXCL1/KC- or fMLP-induced migration, but led to significant cell death. Herein we established a novel genetic mouse model to study the role of CD177 and found that CD177 plays an important role in neutrophils.

submitted time 2016-05-12 Hits837Downloads487 Comment 0

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