Current Location:home > Browse

Submitted Date

1. chinaXiv:202003.00007 [pdf]

Brain Functional Specialization is Enhanced among Tai Chi Chuan Practitioners

Chen, Li-Zhen; Yuan, Xinru ; Zhang, Yuanchao ; Zhang, Shu; Zou, Liye ; Yang, Lin ; Chang, Yu-Kai ; Xia, Qixin ; Wang, Yiqun ; Wei, Gao-Xia
Subjects: Psychology >> Cognitive Psychology

Objective: To investigate the effect of long-term Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) practice on practitioners’ brain functional specialization compare with the TCC novices. Methods: 22 TCC practitioners (52.4 ± 6.8 years; 7 males; educated years:12.18 ± 3.03 years) and 18 healthy controls (54.8 ± 6.8 years; 8 males; education years:11.78 ± 2.90 years) matched by age, sex, and education were enrolled. Participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning and cognitive test to measure the differences in functional specialization and cognitive function. Functional specialization was evaluated by voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC) method. Results: Lower middle frontal gyrus (MFG) VMHC in TCC practitioners compared to controls. For TCC practitioners, the longer they practice, the lower their VMHC in precentral and precuneus. TCC practitioners showed better cognition performance. Limitations: Relatively small sample size. Conclusions: Changed VMHC indicated that TCC practice could enhance functional specialization in the middle frontal cortex of practitioners, which may be associated with higher-order cognitive ability.

submitted time 2020-03-05 Hits7660Downloads150 Comment 0

2. chinaXiv:202003.00003 [pdf]

COVID-19 outbreak increased risk of schizophrenia in aged adults

Hu, Wei; Su, Li; Qiao, Juan; Zhu, Jing; Zhou, Yi
Subjects: Psychology >> Clinical and Counseling Psychology

We noticed an unusual increase of first-time patients with schizophrenia (F20) in January 2020 since the outbreak of COVID-19. The aim of this retrospective study is to validate this observation and find potential risk factors, if applicable. A total number of 13,783 records from outpatients in January 2020 were investigated thoroughly. Comparisons between incidence of schizophrenia in outpatients in January 2020 and similar periods of 2017-2019 were made to minimize seasonal influence. Relationship of incidence of schizophrenia and COVID-19 infections in China was calculated. Limited personal information (age, gender, approximate residence) was analyzed to find risk factors.After excluding seasonal factors such as Spring festival, a positive relationship between incidence of schizophrenia in first-time patients and countrywide epidemic situation was found. Statistical results further showed a significant increase of median age from 39 to 50 for first-time patients diagnosed with schizophrenia which is unusual. Meanwhile, a slight but not significant change was found in distribution of gender and approximate residence (urban/suburb). Our data supported that COVID-19 outbreak increased risk of schizophrenia in aged adults which is consistent with the fact that COVID-19 is more lethal to elders. We strongly appeal that public healthcare in countries either with or without infected patients should prepare in advance for potential risks in public mental health.

submitted time 2020-02-29 Hits12177Downloads1320 Comment 0

3. chinaXiv:202002.00012 [pdf]

Horizontal but not vertical saccades enhance memory retrieval: a meta-analysis and systematic review

Qin, Xiao-jing; Yang, Han-xue ; Cui, Ji-fang ; Ye, Jun-yan ; Wang, Ya
Subjects: Psychology >> Cognitive Psychology

BACKGROUND: Saccade-induced retrieval enhancement (SIRE) refers to the phenomenon that active engaging of horizontal eye movements before recall would enhance subsequent memory performance. This effect is generally thought to be the result of interhemispheric interaction stimulated by saccades. Nonetheless, recent findings do not fully support this hypothesis. An alternative explanation is that saccades promote memory retrieval by improving top-down attention control. Thus, the mechanisms of SIRE are unclear, the present meta-analysis quantitatively analyzed the effect of saccades on memory performance and examined the mechanisms of SIRE through moderator analysis. METHODS: We searched "Web of Science", "PubMed", and "Springer" for peer reviewed papers using the keywords "eye movements + memory" and "saccades + memory". Twenty-two papers were included in the final analysis. RESULTS: There was a significant facilitation of horizontal saccades on overall memory performance, with a pooled effect size (Cohen’s d) of 0.45 (p < 0.001). However, the overall effect of vertical saccades was not significant (d = 0.1, p = 0.14). Moderation analysis showed that the handedness of participants was a significant moderator of the SIRE, with strongly right-handed individuals benefited more from horizontal saccades than non-strongly right-handed individuals (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Horizontal saccades improved memory performances, particularly for the strongly right-handed individuals, these results support the interhemispheric interaction hypothesis.

submitted time 2020-02-05 Hits6139Downloads184 Comment 0

4. chinaXiv:201912.00026 [pdf]

Spotting Macro- and Micro-expression Intervals in Long Video Sequences

Ying He; Su-Jing Wang; Jingting Li; Moi Hoon Yap
Subjects: Psychology >> Cognitive Psychology

This paper presents baseline results for the Third Facial Micro-Expression Grand Challenge (MEGC 2020). Both macro- and micro-expression intervals in CAS(ME)^2 and SAMM Long Videos are spotted by employing the method of Main Directional Maximal Difference Analysis (MDMD). The MDMD method uses the magnitude maximal difference in the main direction of optical flow features to spot facial movements. The single frame prediction results of the original MDMD method are post processed into reasonable video intervals. The metric F1-scores of baseline results are evaluated: for CAS(ME)^2, the F1-scores are 0.1196 and 0.0082 for macro- and micro-expressions respectively, and the overall F1-score is 0.0376; for SAMM Long Videos, the F1-scores are 0.0629 and 0.0364 for macro- and micro-expressions respectively, and the overall F1-score is 0.0445. The baseline project codes is publicly available at https://github.com/HeyingGithub/Baseline-project-for-MEGC2020_spotting.

submitted time 2019-12-20 Hits7147Downloads257 Comment 0

5. chinaXiv:201905.00002 [pdf]

Females Meditate and Males Play Games: Gender Differences in the Benefits of Meditation Training

Wang, Yuzheng; Chen, Yahong; Sun, Yuqi; Zhang, Ke; Wang, Ning; Sun, Yabin; Lin, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Jinyan; Luo, Fei
Subjects: Psychology >> Applied Psychology

Although extensive research has shown the benefits of meditation on attention, evidence for the benefits of short-term meditation training remains scarce. In addition, prior studies on these benefits have included considerably more females than males, potentially concealing gender differences in attention training effects. Here we present a longitudinal study including equal-sample male and female participants to explore potential gender differences in short-term meditation training effects on an attentional blink (AB) task. One hundred and sixty-five college students were randomly divided into three groups: meditation training, video game training and control (no training). Participants were asked to complete the Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and to rate their level of emotional state and time spent on video game playing per day. Participants then completed a 4-day, 20-min training including meditation training, video game training, or a waiting period (control). After training, participants rated their arousal state and emotional state, and performed the AB task. Results showed that participants who completed either short-term meditation training or video game training showed significant improvement on AB performance. Interestingly, meditation training was more effective in females, while video game training was more effective in males. Meditation training, but not video game training, decreased anxiety scores. The current results indicate that gender plays an important role in the benefits of attention training. It is essential that clinicians take gender into consideration when implementing meditation based therapy.

submitted time 2019-05-05 Hits3952Downloads390 Comment 0

6. chinaXiv:201711.00276 [pdf]

DPABI: Data Processing & Analysis for (Resting-State) Brain Imaging

Chao-Gan Yan; Xin-Di Wang; Xi-Nian Zuo; Yu-Feng Zang
Subjects: Psychology >> Applied Psychology

Brain imaging efforts are being increasingly devoted to decode the functioning of the human brain. Among neuroimaging techniques, resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) is currently expanding exponentially. Beyond the general neuroimaging analysis packages (e.g., SPM, AFNI and FSL), REST and DPARSF were developed to meet the increasing need of user-friendly toolboxes for R-fMRI data processing. To address recently identified methodological challenges of R-fMRI, we introduce the newly developed toolbox, DPABI, which was evolved from REST and DPARSF. DPABI incorporates recent research advances on head motion control and measurement standardization, thus allowing users to evaluate results using stringent control strategies. DPABI also emphasizes test-retest reliability and quality control of data processing. Furthermore, DPABI provides a user-friendly pipeline analysis toolkit for rat/monkey R-fMRI data analysis to reflect the rapid advances in animal imaging. In addition, DPABI includes preprocessing modules for task-based fMRI, voxel-based morphometry analysis, statistical analysis and results viewing. DPABI is designed to make data analysis require fewer manual operations, be less time-consuming, have a lower skill requirement, a smaller risk of inadvertent mistakes, and be more comparable across studies. We anticipate this open-source toolbox will assist novices and expert users alike and continue to support advancing R-fMRI methodology and its application to clinical translational studies.

submitted time 2017-11-06 Hits6808Downloads1823 Comment 0

7. chinaXiv:201711.00274 [pdf]

Concordance Among Indices of Intrinsic Brain Function:Inter-Individual Variation and Temporal Dynamics Perspectives

Chao-Gan Yan; Zhen Yang; Stanley J. Colcombe; Xi-Nian Zuo; Michael P. Milham
Subjects: Psychology >> Experimental Psychology

Various resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) measures have been developed to characterize intrinsic brain activity. While each of these measures has gained a growing presence in the literature, questions remain regarding the common and unique aspects these indices capture. The present work provided a comprehensive examination of inter-individual variation and intra-individual temporal variation for commonly used measures, including fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations, regional homogeneity, voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity, network centrality and global signal correlation. Regardless of whether examining intra-individual or inter-individual variation, we found that these definitionally distinct R-fMRI indices tend to exhibit a relatively high degree of covariation. When taken as a measure of intrinsic brain function, inter-individual differences in concordance for R-fMRI indices appeared to be stable, and negatively related to age (i.e., functional concordance among indices decreases with age). To understand the functional significance of concordance, we noted that higher concordance was generally associated with higher strengths of R-fMRI indices, regardless of whether looking through the lens of inter-individual (i.e., high vs. low concordance participants) or intra-individual (i.e., high vs. low concordance states identified via temporal dynamic analyses) differences. Finally, temporal dynamics analyses also revealed that high concordance states are characterized by increased within- and between-network functional connectivity, suggesting more general variations in network integration and segregation. The current study draws attention to questions regarding how to select an R-fMRI index for usage in a given study, as well as how to compare findings across studies that examine inter-individual or group differences using different indices. Additionally, our work suggests global neural signals exist in the brain, and their spontaneous variations over time result in fluctuations in the connectedness of brain regions.

submitted time 2017-11-06 Hits3962Downloads1076 Comment 0

8. chinaXiv:201703.01054 [pdf]

Impaired spinal glucocorticoid receptor signaling contributes to the attenuating effect of depression on mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with neuropathic pain

Wei, Xiao; Sun, Yuqi; Luo, Fei
Subjects: Biology >> Neurobiology

Although depression-induced altered pain perception has been described in several laboratory and clinical studies, its neurobiological mechanism in the central nervous system, particularly in the spinal dorsal horn remains unclear. In this study, we therefore aimed to clarify whether nociceptive sensitivity of neuropathic pain is altered in the olfactory bulbectomy (OB) model of depression and whether glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which is involved in the etio-pathologic mechanisms of both major depression and neuropathic pain, contributes to these processes in the spinal dorsal horn of male Sprague-Dawley rats. The results showed that mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia induced by spinal nerve ligation (SNL) were attenuated in OB-SNL rats with decreased spinal GR expression and nuclear translocation, while NOB (non-olfactory bulbectomy)-SNL rats showed an increased spinal GR nuclear translocation. Decreased GR nuclear translocation with normal mechanical nociception and hypoalgesia of thermal nociception were observed in OB-Sham rats, too. Intrathecal injection of GR agonist dexamethasone (4 µg / rat / day for 1 week) eliminated the attenuating effect of depression on the nociceptive hypersensitivity in OB-SNL rats and aggravated neuropathic pain in NOB-SNL rats, associating with the up-regulation of BDNF, TrkB and NR2B expression in the spinal dorsal horn. The present study shows that depression attenuates the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia of neuropathic pain and suggests that altered spinal GR-BDNF-TrkB signaling may be one of the reasons for depression-induced hypoalgesia.

submitted time 2017-07-24 Hits2582Downloads1005 Comment 0

9. chinaXiv:201703.01054 [pdf]

Impaired spinal glucocorticoid receptor signaling contributes to the attenuating effect of depression on mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with neuropathic pain

Wei, Xiao; Sun, Yuqi; Luo, Fei
Subjects: Biology >> Neurobiology

Although depression-induced altered pain perception has been described in several laboratory and clinical studies, its neurobiological mechanism in the central nervous system, particularly in the spinal dorsal horn remains unclear. In this study, we therefore aimed to clarify whether nociceptive sensitivity of neuropathic pain is altered in the olfactory bulbectomy (OB) model of depression and whether glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which is involved in the etio-pathologic mechanisms of both major depression and neuropathic pain, contributes to these processes in the spinal dorsal horn of male Sprague-Dawley rats. The results showed that mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia induced by spinal nerve ligation (SNL) were attenuated in OB-SNL rats with decreased spinal GR expression and nuclear translocation, while NOB (non-olfactory bulbectomy)-SNL rats showed an increased spinal GR nuclear translocation. Decreased GR nuclear translocation with normal mechanical nociception and hypoalgesia of thermal nociception were observed in OB-Sham rats, too. Intrathecal injection of GR agonist dexamethasone (4 µg / rat / day for 1 week) eliminated the attenuating effect of depression on the nociceptive hypersensitivity in OB-SNL rats and aggravated neuropathic pain in NOB-SNL rats, associating with the up-regulation of BDNF, TrkB and NR2B expression in the spinal dorsal horn. The present study shows that depression attenuates the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia of neuropathic pain and suggests that altered spinal GR-BDNF-TrkB signaling may be one of the reasons for depression-induced hypoalgesia.

submitted time 2017-03-31 Hits2373Downloads801 Comment 0

  [1 Pages/ 9 Totals]